Featured Knives

  • Boy's Hunter

    This little hunting knife was inspired by my grandsons. More …

  • Lil' Whitetail

    This knife has been an idea of mine for several years. More …

  • Booner

    The Booner is a heavier bladed hunting knife. More …

  • Kickapoo Hunter

    The Kickapoo Hunter is a larger type hunting knife. More …

Boy's Hunter

Steel Type:A-2 Tool Steel
Blade Length:2.5 Inches
Blade Thickness:5/32nds
Blade Hardness:57RC
Handle Stock:Desert Ironwood
Special Feature:Mosaic Pins

This little hunting knife was inspired by my grandsons. I also have several friends whose wives hunt and they need a knife for smaller hand features. This will gut, skin, and dress any whitetail or small game. Blade has a convex grind and is very sharp.

Lil' Whitetail

Steel Type:A-2 Tool Steel
Blade Length:2.75 Inches
Blade Thickness:5/32nds
Blade Hardness:58RC
Handle Stock:Amboynia Burl
Special Feature:Black Liners, Mosaic Pins

This knife has been an idea of mine for several years. My son Mike had a lot of input in the design and original prototype that was made. It’s smaller blade and almost full size handle makes it very functional for dressing large game and for being an easy carry in the field. Convex grind on this blade enables this to do the job.

Booner

Steel Type:A-2 Tool Steel
Blade Length:4.5 Inches
Blade Thickness:5/32nds
Blade Hardness:58RC
Handle Stock:Black Linen Micarta
Special Feature:Nickel/ Silver Pins

The Booner is a heavier bladed hunting knife for those hunters that like a heavier knife in the field. It will handle the dressing chore of most big game animals. As with our other knives a number of different handle materials are available to make the knife of your choosing.

The Kickapoo Hunter

Steel Type:A-2 Tool Steel
Blade Length:5.0 Inches
Blade Thickness:??
Blade Hardness:58RC
Handle Stock:Black/Silver Dymondwood
Special Feature:None

The Kickapoo Hunter is a larger type hunting knife with a 5 Inch blade. Definitely a serious knife in the field or for lighter camp chores. The handle design makes for a sure grip when using this knife. My son Pete encouraged me to design the handle in this way and its design has lots of positive feed back from customers and at shows.

Knife Hand-Crafting

Knife Making .. How we do it in our shop.

We start with a sheet of A-2 tool steel shipped out of a mill in the Chicago area. The sheet is 5/32s or 3/16ths thick. 2 -3 feet wide and 6 foot long. HEAVY. More …

Booner

A. We start with a sheet of A-2 tool steel shipped out of a mill in the Chicago area. The sheet is 5/32s or 3/16ths thick. 2 -3 feet wide and 6 foot long. HEAVY. B. We cut this sheet in to sizes that we can handle C. We take one of our blade designs and lay it out on the sheet we have cut. D. We then cut out a rough shape of our blade template in our steel bandsaw E. From sawing we go to the grinder and grind it to final shape and size it to our template. F. We surface grind the deep scratches out of the blade G. We lay out holes for our handle pins and or lanyard tube H. We smooth grind and buff the tang and then stamp the tang with our name. I. Once it is stamped and holes are drilled we wrap each individual blade in stainless steel foil prior to heat treating . J. We use an Even Heat oven for heat treating. Its controls allow us to Work up to 6 segments of heat and time into our heat treat. The initial heat treat process takes about 2.5 hours . Our Steel is an air quenched steel so after cooling to 100-150 degrees we then run our blades through two tempering processes which require approximately 2 hours for each. Following cooling from the tempering we remove the blades from the foil and then clean them up K. We do a Rockwell test for hardness on each blade, actually we take 3-5 readings on each blade and look for a hardness of 57-60. The majority of the time we run 58-59 in our tests. L. We move the blades then to the work bench and prep them for handles M. We use many different handle materials and pick out various pins to go with the handles we choose or our customer chooses for their knife. Handles are drilled out and sized for the blade they are going on and then glued to the handles with epoxy and the pins. N. Following Glue setting up we begin the shaping and grinding of the handles. We start with a 36 0r 50 grit belt and ‘hog out’ the rough shape of the handle. We then go to a 80 grit belt and bring a final form to the handle making sure all the deep scratches are removed. From the 80 grit we begin to finish grind the handle with a 220 -320 belt depending on handle material. We visually inspect it and feel it for shape and upon being satisfied with it we buff it out. We do a quick clean up of the handle and knife blade then lay out plunge cut lines for the grinding of the blade. O. We begin the grinding of the blade much in the same way as the handle using a courser grit to start, usually a 60 grit and then go to a 80 grit as we grind the edge of the blade letting the belt and grinder do the work. Once we get the edge down to about 1/16 we go to a 320 belt and do the finish grind on the blade. Generally we do a bit of touch up on the blade as we feel it an visually inspect it. We follow up with a buffing process of 240 grit-320 grit- and 600 grit bringing a nice satin finish and incredibly sharp edge. We buff the edge lightly with a green compound and inspect and clean it up for final approval.

  • Bark River Knives

    More Bark River Knives by viewing the Gallery …

  • Buck Knives

    More Buck Knives by viewing the Gallery …

  • Cross Knives

    More Cross Knives by viewing the Gallery …

  • Entrek USA Knives

    More Entrek USA Knives by viewing the Gallery …